On January 1st, a lot of people sit down and write out New Years resolutions. They may want to be healthier, or more successful, or spend more time with family. There is a reason that gym membership spikes around January and falls back off by March. Unfortunately, a lot of New Years Resolutions fail- and here are some reasons as to why.

Changing Yourself Is Hard: Change is inevitable, but changing something about yourself is hard. After all, you’ve lived with yourself as long as you have been alive and some bad habits have been engrained in you for years. You have to be prepared to fight yourself for weeks, if not months, to create better habits.

A Goal Is Not A Plan: Most people fall into the trap of making general resolutions, and that’s all right. But if you want to follow through, you are going to have to sit down and make a plan. For instance, if your resolution is “I want to be healthy” you need to have an idea of how you will accomplish your goal. This can involved drinking an extra glass of water every day, going to the gym three times a week, or learning to meal-prep.

Going too Fast:  If you have a long list of New Years Resolutions, you may need to stop and prioritize. Changing two things about yourself is a lot easier than changing twenty. If you do not want to wait until next year, consider tacking one resolution every month.

Going Brand New: The stroke of midnight makes everything feel brand new- so you may want to be a brand new person. However, keep in mind all of the work you may or may not have done last year. For instance, if you started loosing weight, don’t throw out things that have worked.

Give Yourself Wiggle Room: Give yourself the right to prioritize, change and put off resolutions. Not everything can start on January 1st and not everything should start at once. You should also recognize the difficulty in what you are trying to accomplish and cut yourself slack. Don’t throw up your hands the first time you skip a work out or break a resolution.

As great as resolutions are, there is nothing wrong with not making resolutions. It is generally a good thing, however, to keep working on yourself.