What are your “5 things I wish someone told me when I first started” and why?

1. You’re going to face rejection and that’s a good thing, because every time it happens you’ll learn from it. - When I first started my business, I developed a client acquisition strategy that I thought would give me a near 100% close rate. My arrogance from previous sales jobs was still strong at this point. On the first day of reaching out to new prospects, I got hung up on, laughed at and someone even told me to ‘F*ck off’ - although with each and every call I learnt something.. I tweaked my strategy and over time it lead me to create a new strategy that blew my original out of the water. So learn how to face rejection, and even welcome it!

2. You will encounter a lot of jealousy, from those you least expect it from! - “Everyone wants you to do well, but not better than them” - we’ve all heard this saying before. I can tell you first-hand it really is true. In my first year of business, when things started to come to fruition a few of my really close friends stopped talking to me for absolutely no reason, they just distanced themselves gradually. These are the same friends who egged me on previously. I later got informed they spend a lot of time talking down on my achievements.

3. Others will doubt your success more than you will, don’t let them get in your head. - This is so important. When you first decide to go out against the world on your own and launch a business, you’ll be told by everyone around you of all the potential risks. You’ll be asked about back up plans, you’ll be informed of what could go wrong, and sometimes these thoughts can stay with you and eat away at your motivation. Don’t let them.

4. Grow a team as soon as possible. - The biggest mistake I made early on was thinking I could do everything myself. That was until one day I took a step back to check in with the 80/20 rule. What were the things I spent 80% of my time doing, and were they productive, were they pushing me forward or holding in the same place? I realised that the things I really needed to be doing were only taking up 20% of my time. So I decided to hire someone to take away all of my non-productive tasks and I flipped that 80/20 around. Spending 80% of my time on the tasks that really mattered. I wish I did this sooner!

5. Enjoying the journey is just as important as enjoying the end-goal. - When starting a business it’s easy to obsess over the end goal, so much that you end up forgetting to enjoy the way to the top. That’s the best bit! That’s where all the fun is. The ups, the downs, the late nights, the early mornings - the adventure. Make sure that you enjoy the journey, take breaks to enjoy your new time freedom, spend more time doing things you enjoy - make the most out of life in the moment

Published by john paret