Today’s topic is vaping.  Vaping is a tremendously polarizing topic in today’s consumer market, not only in the United States but worldwide.  There are vaping opponents that point out the dangers in inhaling chemicals such as PG and VG which form the basis of most vaping juices and there is an equally vociferous group of vaping advocates that point to scientific research the basically points out many of the concerns as to the deleterious consequences of PG and VG are hysterically overstated.

As a product manufacturer formulating and distributing over 1,000 products worldwide, I did a tremendous amount of research into vaping and thought long and hard about it before deciding to enter the market back in 2014.  In the end, after my science team and I looked at virtually every piece of data we identified the “real” concerns and the real strengths.  In the end we concluded that we could eliminate the dangers and accentuate the positives in a way that no one else had done to date so we decided to enter the market with 14 different terpene based scents that we called Vapormones™.  By the way, a terpene is a highly specialized volatile oil molecule that a plant gives off which is in part responsible for its final aroma.  There are around 300 different terpenes known to science.

Before getting into the specific dangers and benefits of vaping, I would like to explain a little about vaping in general.  The Oxford Dictionaries word of the year for 2014 was VAPING.  In 2013, it was SELFIE so that is pretty nice company to keep. The Oxford people might not have known it but there was actually great scientific validity for selecting a word dealing with olfaction, as the entire field will soon explode with interest.  Every day we breathe over 23,000 times and move over 400 cubic feet of air.  Aside from the intake of oxygen, in the 2 seconds it takes to inhale, molecules of odor flood through our systems.  Potentially, some of these molecules are capable of triggering biochemical changes in the brain and body.  You simply need the right odor molecules in the proper intensity to create the stimulus that leads to the desired change.

For certain behavioral results (i.e. smoking cessation, mood elevation, etc.), olfaction is stronger than most oral or injectable drugs and virtually every herb.  In fact, overall, the most powerful brain stimuli are now known to be of an olfactory nature, due to the direct proximal connection that the brain has with the olfactory bulb and related olfactory areas.  In order to create lifestyle improvement and/or harm reduction you simply must know what specific area of the brain is responsible for the desired behavior and present the appropriate olfaction stimulant or terpene that turns on (or off) the targeted area.  Extremely effective, incredibly fast and completely benign – terpenes and olfaction is the future of consumer care products.

Perhaps the most exciting aspect of olfaction related products is that they can be employed in a variety of ways, all which work.  For example, the terpenes (scents) may be employed in e-cigarette type devices which is basically vaping.    Or terpenes may be added to portable aroma diffusing devices in the home or they may be offered in inexpensive auto diffusers for continuous use in vehicles creating a true renaissance in Aromatherapy products.  And finally, terpenes may even be mixed with related nutritional components to create dual action mouth sprays. 

I have become a super advocate for terpenes in consumer products including vaping devices and in my following blog entries I will detail both the positives of vaping and the negatives. 

Published by Sadie