Dusting for prints

It’s done at the scene of a crime. (Well, of course, I’m working off my limited knowledge of criminology based upon years of watching cop shows.)

The investigators are looking for finger prints–evidence that one specific person was specifically at this place, specifically involved in a specific way in what transpired–what they refer to as “a person of interest.”

God gave each and every one of us a brain and it is up to us to decide how to use our hands. At the end of those hands are fingers, with tips.

Fingertips.

Our aspiration is to define the way we touch things, the way we handle matters and the way we conduct business, so that when the room is dusted for evidence, our mark, our distinction and our passion will be left behind with our uniqueness.

But since your true contact is touch,you might want to consider what fingerprints you leave behind when you exit a situation.

I have three–a trio of noticeable marks that I want to remain after I’ve left the room. I want people to know that I’ve been there by the touch of my contribution. These are:

  • No worry
  • No hurry
  • No judge and jury

I want to make sure when I walk into situations that my touch removes the need to worry.

I also want people to know that I’m not trying to run in and run out quickly, contributing as little time as possible for a potential solution.

And I certainly want everybody to know when they receive my touch that I am no judge and I am no jury of their heart and soul.

These are the fingerprints I want to leave behind from the hands that contain my touch. I want people to know I was in the room. I’m a person of interest.

Because of that, my touch will always include no worry, no hurry and no judge and jury.