Those who battled with some form of addiction will tell you that taking that first step towards betterment is the hardest thing they had to do in their lives. However, before they started their long journey to recovery, they had to admit to themselves that they have a problem in the first place. This is important to point out because more and more people struggle with some form of addiction without even acknowledging it.

 

To put this into perspective, around 20 million people suffer from alcohol and drug addiction in the United States alone. A study found that 24% of adults in North Dakota have an alcohol problem to some extent. Alabama topped the list with the number of prescribed opioids per capita, while the state of Missouri was negatively dubbed the "capital of Meth." Florida has been actively encouraging the opening of new facilities that offer help to those in need. Today, finding a rehab center in Florida is easier than ever and the results are evident.

 

However, in reality, only a small percentage of people with substance abuse issues actually admits to being an addict and goes on to seek help. We are all victims to a fast-paced world and developing a dependency on a certain substance is more common than ever. If you have any doubts about being an addict yourself, it's okay, you're not alone. Here are a few signs that you should look out for, and if any of them are familiar to you, you should consider seeking professional help.

1. Lack of focus on anything not related to the substance of abuse

 

If the first thing that pops to your mind when you wake up is grabbing a glass of hard liquor or scoring some drugs, you have more than likely developed a dependence, and addiction is right around the corner. Depending on how serious your condition is, you might be unable to focus your attention on anything else before you take a hit of whatever it is that you are craving for. If your mind is completely occupied by the substance for the majority of the time, other aspects of your life will surely suffer. We recommend seeking help as soon as possible because you are still not at the tipping point. Find an institution that can help you before you go deeper down the rabbit hole.

 

2. Your friends and family start to notice changes in your behavior

 

Developing a substance use disorder will affect all aspects of your life, including your relationships. Sooner than later, your friends, co-workers, and especially your family, will start noticing sudden changes in the way you behave. Anxiety is present in almost all forms of addiction. It is followed by irrational actions, severe mood swings, depression, sleep disorders, and many more behavioral changes.

 

3. Your health is deteriorating at a rapid rate

 

A long history of substance abuse will not only ruin your career, relationships, and life in general, it will also greatly affect your overall health. For instance, alcohol abuse can cause liver failure, which can be life-threatening if not treated immediately. Besides affecting your physical health, substance abuse can cause mental health issues as well.

 

Apart from the previously mentioned depression and anxiety, psychosis is a common condition especially present in long-term users. If you notice your health deteriorating, consider seeing a physician immediately. Furthermore, checking into rehab at this point is considered a must. There you will receive help from qualified professionals who can help you battle your addiction while monitoring your health at the same time.

 

4. Your tolerance for the drug has increased

 

Another sign that you might be struggling with addiction is developing an increased tolerance towards the substance of abuse. If you catch yourself constantly increasing the dose in order to get high, your body is probably already used to it. The worst part about this is that, by further increasing the dose, you are inflicting more harm to your body without being aware of it.

5. You're telling yourself you can do it on your own

 

A clear sign of drug addiction is telling yourself you are still in control and outright dismissing any ideas of joining a rehab center. This has to do with the fact that many people are too proud or too scared to admit they have a problem. Especially when confronted by their loved ones. Some decide to commit to treating themselves and maybe even join a Narcotics Anonymous program. Unfortunately, it takes them a few unsuccessful tries to realize that they need a much more intense form of help.

 

Don't wait until you hit rock bottom. Instead, help yourself and those around you by checking into a professional facility.