One of the big themes of the past presidential campaign was the implied influence peddling of the Clinton Foundation during Hillary Clinton’s tenure as secretary of state. This, GOP campaigners said, was a massive conflict of interest and influence peddling that undercut her ability to be an effective head of state. Many in the GOP are still barking up that tree despite the fact that their man won and the target of their witch hunt lost.

What, though, are they thinking (and not doing) about the huge conflict of interests that will be included in Donald Trump’s baggage in January when he moves into 1600 Pennsylvania Avenue?

Some in the media have pointed it out, though not as loudly and as often as they did the unproven allegations about the Clinton Foundation, but neither the congress nor the FBI seem to be taking notice, and for sure, Trump supporters either don’t know or don’t care about it. But, the American people should know, and they should care.

Let’s start with his failure to disclose the details of his finances. He has yet to disclose his tax returns, a sharp departure from past presidential candidates and presidents since the administration of Jimmy Carter. This is the man who should be setting the tone for probity and honesty in government, but it seems he’s riding on the platform of do as I say, not as I do. How, by the way, will his vast commercial interests be managed while he occupies the oval office? Past presidents have put their holdings in blind trusts, out of reach by them personally. He’s leaving his in the hands of his adult children, people who were key players in his campaign, and who are likely to be privy to much of what he does while in office (he took his daughter with him when he met the Japanese prime minister).

As president, he will be called on to make decisions that will have a broad economic impact. How will he structure those decisions so as not to give advantage to his economic interests? Discerning minds would like to know.

Published by Charles Ray