(GP) — Today, we’re going to talk about the differences between these battery types. While we may not be able to settle the score once and for all on which is better. We hope to give you the information you need to make the best possible choice!

Lithium-Ion Battery
Lithium-Ion Batteries began their development in 1912. However, they did not become popular until they were adopted by Sony in 1991. Lithium Ion Batteries have high energy-densities and cost less than lithium-polymer batteries. In addition, they do not require priming when first used and have a low self-discharge. However, lithium-ion batteries do suffer from aging – even when not in use.

Lithium Ion

Type Secondary
Chemical Reaction Varies, depending on electrolyte.
Operating Temperature 4º F to 140º F ( -20º C to 60º C)
Recommended for Cellular telephones, mobile computing devices.
Initial Voltage 3.6 & 7.2
Capacity Varies (generally up to twice the capacity of a Ni-Cd cellular battery)
Discharge RateFlat
Recharge Life300 – 400 cycles for 100%
Charging Temperature 32º F to 140º F (0º C to 60º C)
Storage Life Loses less than 0.1% per month.
Storage Temperature -4º F to 140º F ( -20º C to 60º C)
Disposal
Can be recycled by dropping them off at any of our over 7,200 stores nationwide.

Other Notes
Typically designed to be recharged in the device rather than in an external charger.
The chemical construction of this battery limits it to a rectangular shape.
Lighter than nickel-based secondary batteries with (Ni-Cd and NiMH).

Lithium-Polymer Battery
Lithium-polymer batteries can be dated back to the 1970’s. Their first design included a dry solid polymer electrolyte that resembled a plastic film. Therefore, this type of battery can result in credit card thin designs while still holding relatively good battery life. In addition, lithium-polymer batteries are very lightweight and have improved safety. However, these batteries will cost more to manufacture and have a worse energy density than lithium-ion batteries.

Lithium Polymer

Type Secondary
Chemical Reaction Varies, depending on electrolyte.
Operating Temperature Improved performance at low and high temperatures.
Recommended for Cellular telephones, mobile computing devices.
Initial Voltage 3.6 & 7.2
Capacity Varies depending on the battery; superior to standard lithium-ion.
Discharge Rate Flat
Recharge Life 300 – 400 cycles
Charging Temperature 32º F to 140º F (0º C to 60º C)
Storage Life Loses less than 0.1% per month.
Storage Temperature -4º F to 140º F ( -20º C to 60º C)
Disposal
Can be recycled by dropping them off at any of our over 7,200 stores nationwide.

Other Notes
Typically designed to be recharged in the device rather than in an external charger.
Lighter than nickel-based secondary batteries with (Ni-Cd and NiMH).
Can be made in a variety of shapes.

Is One Better than the Other? Both lithium-ion and lithium-polymer batteries have their pros and cons. Typically, the advantages of a lithium-ion is their high power density, lack of what’s called the memory effect (when batteries become harder to charge over time), and their significantly lower cost than lithium-polymer. In the words, “Lithium-ion batteries are incredibly efficient. They stuff freakish amounts of energy in a tiny package. Lithium-ion batteries are inherently unstable, suffer from aging, and are potentially dangerous. If the barrier that separates the positive and negative electrode is ever breached, the chemical reaction can cause combustion (fire).

Li-Ion Vs Li-Po

As Li-ion batteries have become more popular in consumer electronics, businesses have tried to lower costs by cutting corners. While quality batteries are perfectly safe, you should always be careful when buying no-name brands. Lithium-polymer batteries, on the other hand, are generally robust and flexible, especially when it comes to the size and shape of their build. They are also lightweight, have an extremely low profile, and have a lower chance of suffering from leaking electrolyte. But lithium-polymer batteries are not perfect either. They are significantly more costly to manufacture, and they do not they have the same energy density (amount of power that can be stored) nor lifespan as a lithium-ion.