Business Management is the most popular course choice in higher education institutions, universities and evidently business schools. Everyone wants to be a manager the day after their graduation. It seems so easy, when you sit there in the classroom looking  outside the window, hoping that with all this theory you can be the next Steve Jobs. Unfortunately, this kind of thinking brings to the World the managers who didn't quite learn their lesson in the classroom.

First of all, if you want to be a manager you have to start at the beginning. There is a reason why in hospitality schools, all of us start at the beginning: housekeeping, food and beverage service, reception, etc. You will never find a hospitality school intern immediately take a General Manager position - it is impossible. You have to know what your employees do at the core of your business and the only way to find out is to be one of them.

Why is this important? Simply because next time you pass a judgemental comment to an employee, or decide that a job was poorly done you will think twice before you actually speak. Having passed through all the steps before, makes you appreciate the work of your staff and realise exactly the efforts that are given to complete the job perfectly well.

Have you ever heard the phrase where they say that it all starts from the top? Well, turns out whoever came up with this is right. If a manager is lazy his/her staff will be lazy, if a manager is sloppy the same will apply to the staff. So before you make a comment look at the mirror first, perhaps the problem comes from somewhere else.

The ongoing debate whether Leadership and Management can be taught or learned is and interesting one to explore here. In previous posts, various types of leadership were explored. As a true believer that one is born a leader, I believe that Leadership unfortunately, is either in person from the start or is not there at all. However, Management on the other hand can be learnt and taught. One needs to understand the core concept of management and realise that he or she will mainly delegate tasks to the right people and take the heavy decisions, however, the so called "dirty" or "little" work will be carried out by the staff. Staff appreciation is also part of good management.

Employees need to know that their efforts are acknowledged, this doesn't mean an increase in salary all the time there are other ways to acknowledge and appraise your staff. Someone once told me "keep your staff happy and your business will succeed". I know realise that this person is very wise and also very right. If managers were left on their own, makes me wonder if they could all succeed.

Lastly, I'd like to leave you with a thought: Leaders can all be managers, but not all managers, can be leaders.

Published by Karina Saakyan