Mary’s Mitsubishi Outlander Sport was struck head-on by an alleged drunk driver in San Antonio. She was transported to the hospital immediately after the crash but later died of her critical injuries from the accident. She was only 29 years old and was survived by her husband and eight-year-old son.

You probably don’t know Mary, but she is one of the thousands of people who lose their lives in alcohol-related accidents every year. It’s easy for us to distance ourselves from the tragic stories of people we don’t know.

Mary could have been your child’s fourth-grade teacher, your neighbor, your best friend, your community leader, your childhood babysitter, your niece, cousin, granddaughter, wife, girlfriend, or daughter.

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), approximately 29 people in the U.S. die in an accident involving a drunk driver every day; this equates to about one death every 50 minutes. Not only is there a tragedy every hour, but it’s an expensive lose that can be prevented. How can you, in your community, avoid becoming another statistic?

Never Get Behind the Wheel After You’ve Been Drinking

Most people know that they should never get behind the wheel after having one too many drinks. Unfortunately, some people have driven while “buzzed,” got to their destination safely, and assume that they can do it again without any issues.

Even if you think you know your “limit,” it’s still crucial that you never drive after you’ve had alcohol. Just one or two drinks can impair your judgment and your reaction time.

Have A Back-Up Plan

If you’re heading to the bar for Happy Hour or to a party with some friends, always discuss a backup plan before you start drinking. Designate a driver or use a ridesharing service like Uber or Lyft. If you see your designated driver having a drink, don’t let them drive or get in the car with them.

With so many backup plan options, there’s no reason why you should risk your life or the lives of others while on the road.

Pledge to Be A Sober Driver

Believe it or not, holding yourself accountable may help you make safer and more responsible decisions when it comes to whether or not you decide to get behind the wheel.

Whether you make up your own personal pledge or sign one online, tell your friends and family that you’re making a commitment to driving sober. Encourage them to do the same and ask them to remind you of your pledge before you get behind the wheel of your vehicle.

Be A Good Role Model

You don’t need to be a parent or educator to be a good role model. By being a safe and responsible driver, you are impacting the lives of everyone around you. Not only can you be a good role model for younger drivers, but you can inspire others to think twice before getting behind the wheel after they’ve enjoyed a drink or two.

 

Published by Peter Garlow