I've heard it all now at this point. The exercise jokes. The good natured teasing. The "hey can you do this?" as friends share crazy exercise stunts with me. My son calls me when he needs muscles for a project. If I mention needing something from the store I'm told "well, run and go get it" Recently with the Pokémon Go games going on my sons are asking me if I want to walk 5/10K's  to "help them out" .....

Ah yes... and you know what? I love it.

Exercise has made me strong and fit and able to do things in the rest of my life when I'm not exercising. When I'm jokingly told to run to the store for something, I honestly know I could do it. When I'm asked to help lift heavy things, I know my body has been trained and I can respond and do the task at hand.

I haven't always embraced the workouts or been excited for the new  adventure for the day.

Oh no.

I grumbled. I  whined to myself. I found excuses. I pondered ways to wiggle out of doing it. I hated how hard it was.  I didn't like how my heart felt like it was going to explode out of my chest or my legs felt like rubber.

No, I wasn't a huge fan of working out.

And from what I've gathered, a lot of you aren't either. You cite many of the same reasons.

I've talked to so many people, trying to encourage them, that if they just start, just take the steps to do something every day they will be on their way.

It isn't easy. I won't lie. You have to intentionally get your body dressed, up and out for whatever fun activity you have planned.

exercise motivation

You have to determine that your workout is just as important as the breakfast your going to eat, or the job you will go to, or the grocery shopping you will do or anything else.

That, is a very intentional move my friends.

I talked to a young friend recently whom I hadn't chatted with in awhile. He told me he had gotten into a routine, going to the gym, and that weeks on vacation had derailed him. But, as he was eager to tell me, "I could hardly wait to get back to it. I know you always told me I could get to that point  ( of wanting to do it) but I had to get started to understand that"

He was a former " I hate exercise" person.

I know others who were in that club and who have come to the other side ;)

I think, there are some common threads that the former "I hate exercise" club members have in common ( I included myself in this club too)

  • There is a desire, a wish, to improve and be better.
  • The individual learns to ( daily) power through any excuses and go get the job done.
  • They are realistic and start with small goals and gradually increase their activity.
  • They select something they enjoy doing, want to do, and look forward to doing.
  • They understand they are in a competition with no one but themselves.
  • Set backs can happen and you just get right back at it again.
  • Strength isn't built in a day and you learn to appreciate your body for the amazing machine it is as it adapts to the demands you put on it.
  • You recognize that giving your body purposeful movement isn't to be viewed as a negative, but rather, a way to show love to it.
  • You begin to love the changes and all the energy you get from your exercise.

Perhaps even now, you are still in that club, but you have the desire to change.  Awesome!

Consider these things as you make that move:

Be patient with yourself.  Rome wasn't built in a day.

Commit to the process. Make no excuses. None. ( unless you are honestly ill or injured )

Pick an activity you WANT to do. Heck, pick a couple. I think variety is what keeps you from getting bored. Not only that, multiple activities work all of your body.

Buy the right gear or equipment for your new activity. Even now nothing makes me more excited to get to my activity than knowing I have something new to wear ;)

Focus on the day you are in and just do that day.

Celebrate yourself when you are done. It's ok to tell yourself "good job!" I mean, honestly, when I come flying back in from a run or miles on my bike, I have no one standing there cheerleading my efforts. It's ok to be proud of yourself for getting out and getting it done.

Share your accomplishments on social media. Not only do you have accountability, whether you realize it or not, you will be an encouragement to someone else.

Finally, learn to view exercise as a way to love your body and to celebrate all the amazing things it can do.

What motivated you to start exercising? Has it been easy to stay with it?

Published by Cathie De La Rosa