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When people think of depression, there are many false ideas that come to mind. Look at the attached picture...
The first two myths, being extremely sad or very suicidal, bug me the most! 
Yeah, I have days where I am "extremely sad." Those are the days that I have to force myself out of bed. Those are not every day, though. For the majority of the time, I am very upbeat and positive. I spend most of my time at work with my coworkers laughing and cutting up. I am talking to my patients trying to be a positive and helpful influence. When I'm in my car by myself or with friends, I usually have my music blaring and singing and laughing. I try to never let anyone see me when I'm down. Before medicine, it was harder to control and I would be upset and/or sad more, but you would have to be very close to me in my life to see it. In all honestly, only my husband sees this side of me. 
Very suicidal: No, I'm never suicidal. I fought TOO HARD to live to give up. Does that mean my depression isn't real? No! I fight my inner demons on a daily basis. I just never have the urge to end my own life. Yes, there are some people who do become suicidal, as sad as it is. But it is not a requirement for depression. 
Only mentally related symptoms: Puh-lease! I have been so depressed that my whole body has hurt! I have a damaged muscle in my back already. Every time I become depressed and stressed, my back hurts so bad I can barely move my arms. I get headaches to the point that it is probably an inch away from a full-blown migraine. Depression can cause physical illness in some, if not a lot, of people. 
When these myths are spread without the truth to debunk them, people will never understand depression. I've had patients tell me that their families cannot deal with them anymore because they think they are just attention seeking with their depression. I've seen patients who do not even want to leave their beds. People who take a low dose antidepressant are scared for friends and loved ones to know because of the stigma... 
I'm not trying to diagnose or be a saint or any of that. But as a caring person, if you believe you have depression and need help, do not be afraid to see the doctor for help. If your loved ones look at you differently, tell them to do some research so that they can break the stigma for themselves...

Published by Nurse D