Do you ever wake up craving something? 

Crave is defined as to long for; want greatly; desire eagerly such as to crave sweets; to crave affection or to require; need or to ask earnestly for (something); beg for.

When we think of cravings we usually think of food, but our cravings are not limited to our physical sense of taste. We have cravings that involve things, relationships, places and more.  There are those who crave sports, those who crave shopping and those who crave acceptance and love.

We all have cravings and we are all unique in what we crave. Whether it be the right job, the latest iPhone, sex, money, the perfect marriage, the perfect girlfriend or boyfriend, acceptance, power, escape, or destiny we are people with insatiable desires and cravings which dictate the choices we make in life. So what about you? What do you crave in life?

We all have inner longings. Sometimes those longings can be so deep they engulf our very souls. More than three thousand years ago, a king named Solomon chronicled his search for fulfillment. He was the wisest and richest man of all time. If anyone could stroll down every conceivable avenue of potential satisfaction, it was Solomon, king of Israel. The book of Ecclesiastes detailed his pursuit of pleasure.

Solomon constructed a palace so opulent it staggered world leaders, accumulated innumerable jewels and possessions, and was with a different woman every night. He explored it all, yet with tears of frustration concluded, “So I hated life, because the work that is done under the sun was grievous to me. All of it is meaningless, a chasing after the wind.” (Ecclesiastes 2:17).

What our soul truly longs for is a relationship with God. God has planted eternity in our hearts.  No matter how rewarding we may find our job, relationships, wealth, etc…that longing can never be satisfied apart from God. Whenever my soul starts to long for something I am reminded that only God can satisfy my inner longings. I have learned that no matter the amount of money you make, no matter how big the house is, or how wonderful the marriage or relationship may be, there is something in our hearts that is eternal and only God can meet that need.

“He has made everything beautiful in its time. He has also set eternity in the human heart; yet no one can fathom what God has done from beginning to end.” (Ecclesiastes 3:11)

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We are unique because we hunger for something the experiences of this world cannot satisfy—a quest for eternity. People are looking for the eternity God created them to long for, but they can’t find it on their own.

As Solomon reveals to us, fulfillment must come from a source outside ourselves and beyond this world: “A person can do nothing better than to eat and drink and find satisfaction in their own toil. This too, I see, is from the hand of God, for without him, who can eat or find enjoyment?” (Ecclesiastes 2:24-25).

If you could wish for anything in the world, what do you most desire? What would you give in exchange for the satisfaction of that longing?

Then he called the crowd to him along with his disciples and said: “Whoever wants to be my disciple must deny themselves and take up their cross and follow me. For whoever wants to save their life will lose it, but whoever loses their life for me and for the gospel will save it. What good is it for someone to gain the whole world, yet forfeit their soul? Or what can anyone give in exchange for their soul?  If anyone is ashamed of me and my words in this adulterous and sinful generation, the Son of Man will be ashamed of them when he comes in his Father’s glory with the holy angels.” (Mark 8:34- 38)

Is anything worth more than your soul? 

Do you sense that same longing in your soul? Have you known the emptiness of looking for satisfaction in the next raise or relationship or reward? Like Solomon, you have a longing for eternity only God can satisfy.  God Himself is the One who has placed eternity in our hearts—and only He can fill it.

Blessings!

Published by Dr. A. Francine Green