Is there a finer city in the world than London in the sun? From the lush, hilly grounds of Hampstead Heath, Greenwich Park and Alexandra Palace, to the sparkling waters of The Serpentine, the River Lea and Walthamstow Reservoirs, the outdoors is where it’s best in London in the summer (if you’re planning a visit, you can find short-term lets in London here). So never mind all those amazing museums, galleries, shops and restaurants, and instead make sure you don’t leave London without going on at least one of these wonderful city walks (and don’t worry, you’ll find plenty of history, sights, shopping and food along the way):

1. Waterlow Park – Primrose Hill

Starting off from the borders of north London’s Highgate and Archway – famous for their old pubs and legends of the highwayman Dick Turpin, and mayor of London, Dick Whittington – Waterlow Park is a favourite park for those in the know, small, beautifully landscaped, and graced by Lauderdale House, which offers a lovely cup of tea and bite to eat.

Having enjoyed the view and ponds, head down to and along Swain’s Lane and you’ll find the historic Highgate Cemetery, everlasting home to, among others, Karl Marx. It really is a beautiful cemetery, full of winding, overgrown paths, not to mention poets, philosophers and scientists of times past.

Keep to Swain’s Lane and you’ll happen upon Parliament Hill Fields, which forms the bottom corner of the famous Hampstead Heath. Hampstead Heath offers a tremendous amount of terrain to explore and enjoy, and Parliament Hill Fields affords one of the very best views of London.

Having walked across the fields, you can exit via the east-side ponds onto South End Road, from where you can wind your way through Hampstead Village and then Belsize Park along Haverstock Hill road. Turn right on England’s Lane and then left on Primrose Hill Road. Once you reach Primrose Hill itself, head on up, take in the wonderful view, and be sure to have a well-deserved sit-down. Then make your way towards the village to have a welcome cup of coffee and toasted sandwich.

2. The South Bank

Having explored the Palace of Westminster, Parliament Square Garden and Big Ben, cross over Westminster Bridge, turning left towards the City once you reach the other side. A stroll along the South Bank will give you the chance to spend some time with the River Thames, its river taxis, barges and ships, as you make your way towards one of the world’s most famous bridges, Tower Bridge.

Along the way, you’ll pass the London Aquarium and The London Dungeon before reaching the London Eye. If you choose to go for a spin on Europe’s largest Ferris wheel, you’ll have one of the best vantage points conceivable looking across one of the most famous and exciting cities in the world.

Keep going, past the Royal Festival Hall and past the Oxo Tower, enjoying all the music and street performers as you do. After Blackfriars Bridge you’ll reach one of the highlights of this walk and any visit to London: Tate Modern. Even if you want to stay outside, just go in to walk through the famous Turbine Hall to check out its most recent installation – the enormous cavernous space alone will make this minor detour well worth it.

Now you’ll pass Shakespeare’s Globe theatre, the fantastic and faithful reconstruction of the Globe Theatre, spiritual home of the works of William Shakespeare. Now you’ll have a choice: either cross over Millennium Bridge, the famous footbridge that leads towards St Paul’s Cathedral, or press onward towards Tower Bridge. Whichever you choose, an iconic, world-famous site awaits.

3. Camden Town – Little Venice

Camden Town is famous for its market, nightlife and live music, so it’s well worth spending some time here to hunt around and soak up the atmosphere. It’s close to The Regent’s Park and Primrose Hill, not to mention London Zoo – so there’s plenty to enjoy and discover.

However, if you’d like to do something a little different, something that seemingly transports you to an entirely different place altogether, you can go for a beautiful walk besides the Regent Canal to Little Venice. The route will take you by London Zoo, you’ll pass the stunning Regency town houses of Robert Nash, and you’ll also find the charming houseboats and barges that populate the three-way canal junction that forms Little Venice, itself.

Here you can take your pick from a number of cafes, restaurants and pubs. Find a table on a patio or at the waterside to sit down and peacefully observe the canal activity as you enjoy a tasty lunch and glass of wine.