"Fourteen-year-old Dita is one of the many imprisoned by the Nazis at Auschwitz. Taken, along with her mother and father, from the Terezin ghetto in Prague, Dita is adjusting to the constant terror that is life in the camp. When Jewish leader Freddy Hirsch asks Dita to take charge of the eight precious volumes the prisoners have managed to sneak past the guards, she agrees. And so Dita becomes the librarian of Auschwitz.
Based on the experience of real-life Auschwitz prisoner Dita Kraus, this is the incredible story of a girl who risked her life to keep the magic of books alive during the Holocaust.

Out of one of the darkest chapters of human history comes this extraordinary story of courage and hope."

This book was absolutely amazing.

I am a huge fan of historical fiction, so getting to read an historical fiction that was based on actual events made for a wonderful reading experience.

Given the subject matter it didn't surprise me that this was a deeply moving book. I felt like I was on an emotional roller coaster from start to finish. What surprised me about this book was that even through all of the horrors that the characters experienced this book still have genuine moments of hope and joy, I really didn't expect this book to have such a warmth about it.

Another thing that surprised me was the addition of an epilogue. I am so glad there was an epilogue at the end of this book. I became so emotionally attached to these characters I don't know how I would have coped if I didn't get to find out what had happened to them. Good or bad, I'm glad I got to know.

I think the fact this this book follows a young girl gives this story an innocence that you don't usually find in historical fiction. The joy and happiness that Dita and the other young charactrs got from books is something that I believe would have been lost if it was told from an adults point of view.

As a reader, I loved seeing the impact the books had on the characters. Seeing how these simple, damaged books changed both hearts and minds made me truly greatful for my love of books.

The Librarian Of Auschwitz by Antoni Iturbe, Translated by Lilit Zekulin Thwaites is a must read for everyone. This story will stay with you long after the final page.