Why should we pay teachers more if all they do is teach? Well, think again...

 

When was the last time a 15 year veteran high school English teacher cared enough to research robotics so that her budding engineer student who is learning how to create and develop the next generation of robots has the future skills that he needs to reach his dreams.

Originally published in BOLD Favor Magazine

Over the past 20 years, the Met Schools have been flourishing in many major cities across the USA, from Providence, Rhode Island to San Diego, California. Their graduation rates are soaring in areas once deemed high school drop-out zones.

Nationally recognized innovators Dennis Littky and Elliot Washor have turned the traditional education model on its head to create a blueprint for all the Met Schools, which is the Big Picture Learning, (BPL), approach that is rooted in the three R’s—relationships; relevant real-world projects driven by student’s aspirations and interests; and rigor of meeting all of the educational requirements.

In 1995, former Rhode Island Education Commissioner Peter McWalters asked two former renowned principals Littky and Washor to build from the ground up a metropolitan career and technical education center, The Met, in one of the poorest districts in Providence. They were hired because of their track record for turning failing schools around explained Carlos Moreno, Co-Executive of Big Picture Learning Company.

Today, Met Schools are cropping up everywhere with the support from the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation and many others.

“The biggest problem with traditional schools today is that they look exactly as they did when the concept of schools first began,” said Moreno, “where teachers are purveyors of knowledge and students are simply the recipients.”

They are large, impersonal institutions that rely heavily on standardized testing. Moreover, Moreno explains the disconnect between learning in the classroom and applying knowledge in the real-world.

“We start by building relationships with our students, connecting to their families, helping to understand the student’s entire situation,” explained Moreno. Met schools don’t focus on student’s challenges but do provide extra support as needed.

Met students build a personalized learning plan based on their interests and as interns they develop a product or program that addresses a  real-world problem in that industry working closely with their mentor.

Veteran English Teacher Barbara Gardner, who came to Met East High School in Camden, New Jersey three years ago, has seen tremendous growth in her students.

This year her sophomore class presents their Gateway research project. One student is interested in robotics, so he is pursuing his internship at a local engineering firm where he is using computer-aided design to create a line of robots.

“We will be building all of his future skills, and the whole time he will be studying something that he loves,” says Gardner.    “I oversee student’s personal learning plans really wrapping in all the different content areas into a project to make sure that they are rigorous enough.”  

Why has Moreno made BPL his life’s work? He knows the tremendous challenges that students have and the support that they need to cross the finish line.

 “So we look at their schooling as a marathon--not a four-yard dash. These kids could end up joining gangs, in prison, or even dead but they don’t because they are engaged in the learning process and that has transformed their lives,” says Moreno.

Middle School Students Led Socratic Seminars for Parents and Peers

For her senior thesis, Lashonda Midget, former Met East High School student, in Camden, NJ, combined her passion for studying the law and psychology to initiate and run Socratic seminars in her former middle school. Midget not only engaged middle school students in debate and taught them how to support their arguments using Socratic principles, but she also taught them the value of hard work. Now she is studying psychology in college.

 

Has a teacher inspired you or your child to realize her dreams and unlock her potential?

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Met Schools Have Radically Transformed the Lives of Disadvantaged Adolescents

By Lynda Dell

Over the past 20 years, the Met Schools have been flourishing in many major cities across the USA, from Providence, Rhode Island to San Diego, California. Their graduation rates are soaring in areas once deemed high school drop-out zones.

Nationally recognized innovators Dennis Littky and Elliot Washor have turned the traditional education model on its head to create a blueprint for all the Met Schools, which is the Big Picture Learning, (BPL), approach that is rooted in the three R’s—relationships; relevant real-world projects driven by student’s aspirations and interests; and rigor of meeting all of the educational requirements.

In 1995, former Rhode Island Education Commissioner Peter McWalters asked two former renowned principals Littky and Washor to build from the ground up a metropolitan career and technical education center, The Met, in one of the poorest districts in Providence. They were hired because of their track record for turning failing schools around explained Carlos Moreno, Co-Executive of Big Picture Learning Company.

Today, Met Schools are cropping up everywhere with the support from the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation and many others.

“The biggest problem with traditional schools today is that they look exactly as they did when the concept of schools first began,” said Moreno, “where teachers are purveyors of knowledge and students are simply the recipients.”

They are large, impersonal institutions that rely heavily on standardized testing. Moreover, Moreno explains the disconnect between learning in the classroom and applying knowledge in the real-world.

“We start by building relationships with our students, connecting to their families, helping to understand the student’s entire situation,” explained Moreno. Met schools don’t focus on student’s challenges but do provide extra support as needed.

Met students build a personalized learning plan based on their interests and as interns they develop a product or program that addresses a  real-world problem in that industry working closely with their mentor.

Veteran English Teacher Barbara Gardner, who came to Met East High School in Camden, New Jersey three years ago, has seen tremendous growth in her students.

This year her sophomore class presents their Gateway research project. One student is interested in robotics, so he is pursuing his internship at a local engineering firm where he is using computer-aided design to create a line of robots.

“We will be building all of his future skills, and the whole time he will be studying something that he loves,” says Gardner.    “I oversee student’s personal learning plans really wrapping in all the different content areas into a project to make sure that they are rigorous enough.”  

Why has Moreno made BPL his life’s work? He knows the tremendous challenges that students have and the support that they need to cross the finish line.

 “So we look at their schooling as a marathon--not a four-yard dash. These kids could end up joining gangs, in prison, or even dead but they don’t because they are engaged in the learning process and that has transformed their lives,” says Moreno.

Middle School Students Led Socratic Seminars for Parents and Peers

For her senior thesis, Lashonda Midget, former Met East High School student, in Camden, NJ, combined her passion for studying the law and psychology to initiate and run Socratic seminars in her former middle school. Midget not only engaged middle school students in debate and taught them how to support their arguments using Socratic principles, but she also taught them the value of hard work. Now she is studying psychology in college.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Met Schools Have Radically Transformed the Lives of Disadvantaged Adolescents

By Lynda Dell

Over the past 20 years, the Met Schools have been flourishing in many major cities across the USA, from Providence, Rhode Island to San Diego, California. Their graduation rates are soaring in areas once deemed high school drop-out zones.

Nationally recognized innovators Dennis Littky and Elliot Washor have turned the traditional education model on its head to create a blueprint for all the Met Schools, which is the Big Picture Learning, (BPL), approach that is rooted in the three R’s—relationships; relevant real-world projects driven by student’s aspirations and interests; and rigor of meeting all of the educational requirements.

In 1995, former Rhode Island Education Commissioner Peter McWalters asked two former renowned principals Littky and Washor to build from the ground up a metropolitan career and technical education center, The Met, in one of the poorest districts in Providence. They were hired because of their track record for turning failing schools around explained Carlos Moreno, Co-Executive of Big Picture Learning Company.

Today, Met Schools are cropping up everywhere with the support from the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation and many others.

“The biggest problem with traditional schools today is that they look exactly as they did when the concept of schools first began,” said Moreno, “where teachers are purveyors of knowledge and students are simply the recipients.”

They are large, impersonal institutions that rely heavily on standardized testing. Moreover, Moreno explains the disconnect between learning in the classroom and applying knowledge in the real-world.

“We start by building relationships with our students, connecting to their families, helping to understand the student’s entire situation,” explained Moreno. Met schools don’t focus on student’s challenges but do provide extra support as needed.

Met students build a personalized learning plan based on their interests and as interns they develop a product or program that addresses a  real-world problem in that industry working closely with their mentor.

Veteran English Teacher Barbara Gardner, who came to Met East High School in Camden, New Jersey three years ago, has seen tremendous growth in her students.

This year her sophomore class presents their Gateway research project. One student is interested in robotics, so he is pursuing his internship at a local engineering firm where he is using computer-aided design to create a line of robots.

“We will be building all of his future skills, and the whole time he will be studying something that he loves,” says Gardner.    “I oversee student’s personal learning plans really wrapping in all the different content areas into a project to make sure that they are rigorous enough.”  

Why has Moreno made BPL his life’s work? He knows the tremendous challenges that students have and the support that they need to cross the finish line.

 “So we look at their schooling as a marathon--not a four-yard dash. These kids could end up joining gangs, in prison, or even dead but they don’t because they are engaged in the learning process and that has transformed their lives,” says Moreno.

Middle School Students Led Socratic Seminars for Parents and Peers

For her senior thesis, Lashonda Midget, former Met East High School student, in Camden, NJ, combined her passion for studying the law and psychology to initiate and run Socratic seminars in her former middle school. Midget not only engaged middle school students in debate and taught them how to support their arguments using Socratic principles, but she also taught them the value of hard work. Now she is studying psychology in college.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Met Schools Have Radically Transformed the Lives of Disadvantaged Adolescents

By Lynda Dell

Over the past 20 years, the Met Schools have been flourishing in many major cities across the USA, from Providence, Rhode Island to San Diego, California. Their graduation rates are soaring in areas once deemed high school drop-out zones.

Nationally recognized innovators Dennis Littky and Elliot Washor have turned the traditional education model on its head to create a blueprint for all the Met Schools, which is the Big Picture Learning, (BPL), approach that is rooted in the three R’s—relationships; relevant real-world projects driven by student’s aspirations and interests; and rigor of meeting all of the educational requirements.

In 1995, former Rhode Island Education Commissioner Peter McWalters asked two former renowned principals Littky and Washor to build from the ground up a metropolitan career and technical education center, The Met, in one of the poorest districts in Providence. They were hired because of their track record for turning failing schools around explained Carlos Moreno, Co-Executive of Big Picture Learning Company.

Today, Met Schools are cropping up everywhere with the support from the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation and many others.

“The biggest problem with traditional schools today is that they look exactly as they did when the concept of schools first began,” said Moreno, “where teachers are purveyors of knowledge and students are simply the recipients.”

They are large, impersonal institutions that rely heavily on standardized testing. Moreover, Moreno explains the disconnect between learning in the classroom and applying knowledge in the real-world.

“We start by building relationships with our students, connecting to their families, helping to understand the student’s entire situation,” explained Moreno. Met schools don’t focus on student’s challenges but do provide extra support as needed.

Met students build a personalized learning plan based on their interests and as interns they develop a product or program that addresses a  real-world problem in that industry working closely with their mentor.

Veteran English Teacher Barbara Gardner, who came to Met East High School in Camden, New Jersey three years ago, has seen tremendous growth in her students.

This year her sophomore class presents their Gateway research project. One student is interested in robotics, so he is pursuing his internship at a local engineering firm where he is using computer-aided design to create a line of robots.

“We will be building all of his future skills, and the whole time he will be studying something that he loves,” says Gardner.    “I oversee student’s personal learning plans really wrapping in all the different content areas into a project to make sure that they are rigorous enough.”  

Why has Moreno made BPL his life’s work? He knows the tremendous challenges that students have and the support that they need to cross the finish line.

 “So we look at their schooling as a marathon--not a four-yard dash. These kids could end up joining gangs, in prison, or even dead but they don’t because they are engaged in the learning process and that has transformed their lives,” says Moreno.

Middle School Students Led Socratic Seminars for Parents and Peers

For her senior thesis, Lashonda Midget, former Met East High School student, in Camden, NJ, combined her passion for studying the law and psychology to initiate and run Socratic seminars in her former middle school. Midget not only engaged middle school students in debate and taught them how to support their arguments using Socratic principles, but she also taught them the value of hard work. Now she is studying psychology in college.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Met Schools Have Radically Transformed the Lives of Disadvantaged Adolescents

By Lynda Dell

Over the past 20 years, the Met Schools have been flourishing in many major cities across the USA, from Providence, Rhode Island to San Diego, California. Their graduation rates are soaring in areas once deemed high school drop-out zones.

Nationally recognized innovators Dennis Littky and Elliot Washor have turned the traditional education model on its head to create a blueprint for all the Met Schools, which is the Big Picture Learning, (BPL), approach that is rooted in the three R’s—relationships; relevant real-world projects driven by student’s aspirations and interests; and rigor of meeting all of the educational requirements.

In 1995, former Rhode Island Education Commissioner Peter McWalters asked two former renowned principals Littky and Washor to build from the ground up a metropolitan career and technical education center, The Met, in one of the poorest districts in Providence. They were hired because of their track record for turning failing schools around explained Carlos Moreno, Co-Executive of Big Picture Learning Company.

Today, Met Schools are cropping up everywhere with the support from the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation and many others.

“The biggest problem with traditional schools today is that they look exactly as they did when the concept of schools first began,” said Moreno, “where teachers are purveyors of knowledge and students are simply the recipients.”

They are large, impersonal institutions that rely heavily on standardized testing. Moreover, Moreno explains the disconnect between learning in the classroom and applying knowledge in the real-world.

“We start by building relationships with our students, connecting to their families, helping to understand the student’s entire situation,” explained Moreno. Met schools don’t focus on student’s challenges but do provide extra support as needed.

Met students build a personalized learning plan based on their interests and as interns they develop a product or program that addresses a  real-world problem in that industry working closely with their mentor.

Veteran English Teacher Barbara Gardner, who came to Met East High School in Camden, New Jersey three years ago, has seen tremendous growth in her students.

This year her sophomore class presents their Gateway research project. One student is interested in robotics, so he is pursuing his internship at a local engineering firm where he is using computer-aided design to create a line of robots.

“We will be building all of his future skills, and the whole time he will be studying something that he loves,” says Gardner.    “I oversee student’s personal learning plans really wrapping in all the different content areas into a project to make sure that they are rigorous enough.”  

Why has Moreno made BPL his life’s work? He knows the tremendous challenges that students have and the support that they need to cross the finish line.

 “So we look at their schooling as a marathon--not a four-yard dash. These kids could end up joining gangs, in prison, or even dead but they don’t because they are engaged in the learning process and that has transformed their lives,” says Moreno.

Middle School Students Led Socratic Seminars for Parents and Peers

For her senior thesis, Lashonda Midget, former Met East High School student, in Camden, NJ, combined her passion for studying the law and psychology to initiate and run Socratic seminars in her former middle school. Midget not only engaged middle school students in debate and taught them how to support their arguments using Socratic principles, but she also taught them the value of hard work. Now she is studying psychology in college.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Met Schools Have Radically Transformed the Lives of Disadvantaged Adolescents

By Lynda Dell

Over the past 20 years, the Met Schools have been flourishing in many major cities across the USA, from Providence, Rhode Island to San Diego, California. Their graduation rates are soaring in areas once deemed high school drop-out zones.

Nationally recognized innovators Dennis Littky and Elliot Washor have turned the traditional education model on its head to create a blueprint for all the Met Schools, which is the Big Picture Learning, (BPL), approach that is rooted in the three R’s—relationships; relevant real-world projects driven by student’s aspirations and interests; and rigor of meeting all of the educational requirements.

In 1995, former Rhode Island Education Commissioner Peter McWalters asked two former renowned principals Littky and Washor to build from the ground up a metropolitan career and technical education center, The Met, in one of the poorest districts in Providence. They were hired because of their track record for turning failing schools around explained Carlos Moreno, Co-Executive of Big Picture Learning Company.

Today, Met Schools are cropping up everywhere with the support from the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation and many others.

“The biggest problem with traditional schools today is that they look exactly as they did when the concept of schools first began,” said Moreno, “where teachers are purveyors of knowledge and students are simply the recipients.”

They are large, impersonal institutions that rely heavily on standardized testing. Moreover, Moreno explains the disconnect between learning in the classroom and applying knowledge in the real-world.

“We start by building relationships with our students, connecting to their families, helping to understand the student’s entire situation,” explained Moreno. Met schools don’t focus on student’s challenges but do provide extra support as needed.

Met students build a personalized learning plan based on their interests and as interns they develop a product or program that addresses a  real-world problem in that industry working closely with their mentor.

Veteran English Teacher Barbara Gardner, who came to Met East High School in Camden, New Jersey three years ago, has seen tremendous growth in her students.

This year her sophomore class presents their Gateway research project. One student is interested in robotics, so he is pursuing his internship at a local engineering firm where he is using computer-aided design to create a line of robots.

“We will be building all of his future skills, and the whole time he will be studying something that he loves,” says Gardner.    “I oversee student’s personal learning plans really wrapping in all the different content areas into a project to make sure that they are rigorous enough.”  

Why has Moreno made BPL his life’s work? He knows the tremendous challenges that students have and the support that they need to cross the finish line.

 “So we look at their schooling as a marathon--not a four-yard dash. These kids could end up joining gangs, in prison, or even dead but they don’t because they are engaged in the learning process and that has transformed their lives,” says Moreno.

Middle School Students Led Socratic Seminars for Parents and Peers

For her senior thesis, Lashonda Midget, former Met East High School student, in Camden, NJ, combined her passion for studying the law and psychology to initiate and run Socratic seminars in her former middle school. Midget not only engaged middle school students in debate and taught them how to support their arguments using Socratic principles, but she also taught them the value of hard work. Now she is studying psychology in college.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Met Schools Have Radically Transformed the Lives of Disadvantaged Adolescents

By Lynda Dell

Over the past 20 years, the Met Schools have been flourishing in many major cities across the USA, from Providence, Rhode Island to San Diego, California. Their graduation rates are soaring in areas once deemed high school drop-out zones.

Nationally recognized innovators Dennis Littky and Elliot Washor have turned the traditional education model on its head to create a blueprint for all the Met Schools, which is the Big Picture Learning, (BPL), approach that is rooted in the three R’s—relationships; relevant real-world projects driven by student’s aspirations and interests; and rigor of meeting all of the educational requirements.

In 1995, former Rhode Island Education Commissioner Peter McWalters asked two former renowned principals Littky and Washor to build from the ground up a metropolitan career and technical education center, The Met, in one of the poorest districts in Providence. They were hired because of their track record for turning failing schools around explained Carlos Moreno, Co-Executive of Big Picture Learning Company.

Today, Met Schools are cropping up everywhere with the support from the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation and many others.

“The biggest problem with traditional schools today is that they look exactly as they did when the concept of schools first began,” said Moreno, “where teachers are purveyors of knowledge and students are simply the recipients.”

They are large, impersonal institutions that rely heavily on standardized testing. Moreover, Moreno explains the disconnect between learning in the classroom and applying knowledge in the real-world.

“We start by building relationships with our students, connecting to their families, helping to understand the student’s entire situation,” explained Moreno. Met schools don’t focus on student’s challenges but do provide extra support as needed.

Met students build a personalized learning plan based on their interests and as interns they develop a product or program that addresses a  real-world problem in that industry working closely with their mentor.

Veteran English Teacher Barbara Gardner, who came to Met East High School in Camden, New Jersey three years ago, has seen tremendous growth in her students.

This year her sophomore class presents their Gateway research project. One student is interested in robotics, so he is pursuing his internship at a local engineering firm where he is using computer-aided design to create a line of robots.

“We will be building all of his future skills, and the whole time he will be studying something that he loves,” says Gardner.    “I oversee student’s personal learning plans really wrapping in all the different content areas into a project to make sure that they are rigorous enough.”  

Why has Moreno made BPL his life’s work? He knows the tremendous challenges that students have and the support that they need to cross the finish line.

 “So we look at their schooling as a marathon--not a four-yard dash. These kids could end up joining gangs, in prison, or even dead but they don’t because they are engaged in the learning process and that has transformed their lives,” says Moreno.

Middle School Students Led Socratic Seminars for Parents and Peers

For her senior thesis, Lashonda Midget, former Met East High School student, in Camden, NJ, combined her passion for studying the law and psychology to initiate and run Socratic seminars in her former middle school. Midget not only engaged middle school students in debate and taught them how to support their arguments using Socratic principles, but she also taught them the value of hard work. Now she is studying psychology in college.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Met Schools Have Radically Transformed the Lives of Disadvantaged Adolescents

By Lynda Dell

Over the past 20 years, the Met Schools have been flourishing in many major cities across the USA, from Providence, Rhode Island to San Diego, California. Their graduation rates are soaring in areas once deemed high school drop-out zones.

Nationally recognized innovators Dennis Littky and Elliot Washor have turned the traditional education model on its head to create a blueprint for all the Met Schools, which is the Big Picture Learning, (BPL), approach that is rooted in the three R’s—relationships; relevant real-world projects driven by student’s aspirations and interests; and rigor of meeting all of the educational requirements.

In 1995, former Rhode Island Education Commissioner Peter McWalters asked two former renowned principals Littky and Washor to build from the ground up a metropolitan career and technical education center, The Met, in one of the poorest districts in Providence. They were hired because of their track record for turning failing schools around explained Carlos Moreno, Co-Executive of Big Picture Learning Company.

Today, Met Schools are cropping up everywhere with the support from the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation and many others.

“The biggest problem with traditional schools today is that they look exactly as they did when the concept of schools first began,” said Moreno, “where teachers are purveyors of knowledge and students are simply the recipients.”

They are large, impersonal institutions that rely heavily on standardized testing. Moreover, Moreno explains the disconnect between learning in the classroom and applying knowledge in the real-world.

“We start by building relationships with our students, connecting to their families, helping to understand the student’s entire situation,” explained Moreno. Met schools don’t focus on student’s challenges but do provide extra support as needed.

Met students build a personalized learning plan based on their interests and as interns they develop a product or program that addresses a  real-world problem in that industry working closely with their mentor.

Veteran English Teacher Barbara Gardner, who came to Met East High School in Camden, New Jersey three years ago, has seen tremendous growth in her students.

This year her sophomore class presents their Gateway research project. One student is interested in robotics, so he is pursuing his internship at a local engineering firm where he is using computer-aided design to create a line of robots.

“We will be building all of his future skills, and the whole time he will be studying something that he loves,” says Gardner.    “I oversee student’s personal learning plans really wrapping in all the different content areas into a project to make sure that they are rigorous enough.”  

Why has Moreno made BPL his life’s work? He knows the tremendous challenges that students have and the support that they need to cross the finish line.

 “So we look at their schooling as a marathon--not a four-yard dash. These kids could end up joining gangs, in prison, or even dead but they don’t because they are engaged in the learning process and that has transformed their lives,” says Moreno.

Middle School Students Led Socratic Seminars for Parents and Peers

For her senior thesis, Lashonda Midget, former Met East High School student, in Camden, NJ, combined her passion for studying the law and psychology to initiate and run Socratic seminars in her former middle school. Midget not only engaged middle school students in debate and taught them how to support their arguments using Socratic principles, but she also taught them the value of hard work. Now she is studying psychology in college.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Met Schools Have Radically Transformed the Lives of Disadvantaged Adolescents

Originally published in BOLD Favor Magazine

By Lynda Dell

Over the past 20 years, the Met Schools have been flourishing in many major cities across the USA, from Providence, Rhode Island to San Diego, California. Their graduation rates are soaring in areas once deemed high school drop-out zones.

Nationally recognized innovators Dennis Littky and Elliot Washor have turned the traditional education model on its head to create a blueprint for all the Met Schools, which is the Big Picture Learning, (BPL), approach that is rooted in the three R’s—relationships; relevant real-world projects driven by student’s aspirations and interests; and rigor of meeting all of the educational requirements.

In 1995, former Rhode Island Education Commissioner Peter McWalters asked two former renowned principals Littky and Washor to build from the ground up a metropolitan career and technical education center, The Met, in one of the poorest districts in Providence. They were hired because of their track record for turning failing schools around explained Carlos Moreno, Co-Executive of Big Picture Learning Company.

Today, Met Schools are cropping up everywhere with the support from the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation and many others.

“The biggest problem with traditional schools today is that they look exactly as they did when the concept of schools first began,” said Moreno, “where teachers are purveyors of knowledge and students are simply the recipients.”

They are large, impersonal institutions that rely heavily on standardized testing. Moreover, Moreno explains the disconnect between learning in the classroom and applying knowledge in the real-world.

“We start by building relationships with our students, connecting to their families, helping to understand the student’s entire situation,” explained Moreno. Met schools don’t focus on student’s challenges but do provide extra support as needed.

Met students build a personalized learning plan based on their interests and as interns they develop a product or program that addresses a  real-world problem in that industry working closely with their mentor.

Veteran English Teacher Barbara Gardner, who came to Met East High School in Camden, New Jersey three years ago, has seen tremendous growth in her students.

This year her sophomore class presents their Gateway research project. One student is interested in robotics, so he is pursuing his internship at a local engineering firm where he is using computer-aided design to create a line of robots.

“We will be building all of his future skills, and the whole time he will be studying something that he loves,” says Gardner.    “I oversee student’s personal learning plans really wrapping in all the different content areas into a project to make sure that they are rigorous enough.”  

Why has Moreno made BPL his life’s work? He knows the tremendous challenges that students have and the support that they need to cross the finish line.

 “So we look at their schooling as a marathon--not a four-yard dash. These kids could end up joining gangs, in prison, or even dead but they don’t because they are engaged in the learning process and that has transformed their lives,” says Moreno.

Middle School Students Led Socratic Seminars for Parents and Peers

For her senior thesis, Lashonda Midget, former Met East High School student, in Camden, NJ, combined her passion for studying the law and psychology to initiate and run Socratic seminars in her former middle school. Midget not only engaged middle school students in debate and taught them how to support their arguments using Socratic principles, but she also taught them the value of hard work. Now she is studying psychology in college.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Met Schools Have Radically Transformed the Lives of Disadvantaged Adolescents

Originally published in BOLD Favor Magazine

By Lynda Dell

Over the past 20 years, the Met Schools have been flourishing in many major cities across the USA, from Providence, Rhode Island to San Diego, California. Their graduation rates are soaring in areas once deemed high school drop-out zones.

Nationally recognized innovators Dennis Littky and Elliot Washor have turned the traditional education model on its head to create a blueprint for all the Met Schools, which is the Big Picture Learning, (BPL), approach that is rooted in the three R’s—relationships; relevant real-world projects driven by student’s aspirations and interests; and rigor of meeting all of the educational requirements.

In 1995, former Rhode Island Education Commissioner Peter McWalters asked two former renowned principals Littky and Washor to build from the ground up a metropolitan career and technical education center, The Met, in one of the poorest districts in Providence. They were hired because of their track record for turning failing schools around explained Carlos Moreno, Co-Executive of Big Picture Learning Company.

Today, Met Schools are cropping up everywhere with the support from the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation and many others.

“The biggest problem with traditional schools today is that they look exactly as they did when the concept of schools first began,” said Moreno, “where teachers are purveyors of knowledge and students are simply the recipients.”

They are large, impersonal institutions that rely heavily on standardized testing. Moreover, Moreno explains the disconnect between learning in the classroom and applying knowledge in the real-world.

“We start by building relationships with our students, connecting to their families, helping to understand the student’s entire situation,” explained Moreno. Met schools don’t focus on student’s challenges but do provide extra support as needed.

Met students build a personalized learning plan based on their interests and as interns they develop a product or program that addresses a  real-world problem in that industry working closely with their mentor.

Veteran English Teacher Barbara Gardner, who came to Met East High School in Camden, New Jersey three years ago, has seen tremendous growth in her students.

This year her sophomore class presents their Gateway research project. One student is interested in robotics, so he is pursuing his internship at a local engineering firm where he is using computer-aided design to create a line of robots.

“We will be building all of his future skills, and the whole time he will be studying something that he loves,” says Gardner.    “I oversee student’s personal learning plans really wrapping in all the different content areas into a project to make sure that they are rigorous enough.”  

Why has Moreno made BPL his life’s work? He knows the tremendous challenges that students have and the support that they need to cross the finish line.

 “So we look at their schooling as a marathon--not a four-yard dash. These kids could end up joining gangs, in prison, or even dead but they don’t because they are engaged in the learning process and that has transformed their lives,” says Moreno.

Middle School Students Led Socratic Seminars for Parents and Peers

For her senior thesis, Lashonda Midget, former Met East High School student, in Camden, NJ, combined her passion for studying the law and psychology to initiate and run Socratic seminars in her former middle school. Midget not only engaged middle school students in debate and taught them how to support their arguments using Socratic principles, but she also taught them the value of hard work. Now she is studying psychology in college.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Met Schools Have Radically Transformed the Lives of Disadvantaged Adolescents

Originally published in BOLD Favor Magazine

By Lynda Dell

Over the past 20 years, the Met Schools have been flourishing in many major cities across the USA, from Providence, Rhode Island to San Diego, California. Their graduation rates are soaring in areas once deemed high school drop-out zones.

Nationally recognized innovators Dennis Littky and Elliot Washor have turned the traditional education model on its head to create a blueprint for all the Met Schools, which is the Big Picture Learning, (BPL), approach that is rooted in the three R’s—relationships; relevant real-world projects driven by student’s aspirations and interests; and rigor of meeting all of the educational requirements.

In 1995, former Rhode Island Education Commissioner Peter McWalters asked two former renowned principals Littky and Washor to build from the ground up a metropolitan career and technical education center, The Met, in one of the poorest districts in Providence. They were hired because of their track record for turning failing schools around explained Carlos Moreno, Co-Executive of Big Picture Learning Company.

Today, Met Schools are cropping up everywhere with the support from the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation and many others.

“The biggest problem with traditional schools today is that they look exactly as they did when the concept of schools first began,” said Moreno, “where teachers are purveyors of knowledge and students are simply the recipients.”

They are large, impersonal institutions that rely heavily on standardized testing. Moreover, Moreno explains the disconnect between learning in the classroom and applying knowledge in the real-world.

“We start by building relationships with our students, connecting to their families, helping to understand the student’s entire situation,” explained Moreno. Met schools don’t focus on student’s challenges but do provide extra support as needed.

Met students build a personalized learning plan based on their interests and as interns they develop a product or program that addresses a  real-world problem in that industry working closely with their mentor.

Veteran English Teacher Barbara Gardner, who came to Met East High School in Camden, New Jersey three years ago, has seen tremendous growth in her students.

This year her sophomore class presents their Gateway research project. One student is interested in robotics, so he is pursuing his internship at a local engineering firm where he is using computer-aided design to create a line of robots.

“We will be building all of his future skills, and the whole time he will be studying something that he loves,” says Gardner.    “I oversee student’s personal learning plans really wrapping in all the different content areas into a project to make sure that they are rigorous enough.”  

Why has Moreno made BPL his life’s work? He knows the tremendous challenges that students have and the support that they need to cross the finish line.

 “So we look at their schooling as a marathon--not a four-yard dash. These kids could end up joining gangs, in prison, or even dead but they don’t because they are engaged in the learning process and that has transformed their lives,” says Moreno.

Middle School Students Led Socratic Seminars for Parents and Peers

For her senior thesis, Lashonda Midget, former Met East High School student, in Camden, NJ, combined her passion for studying the law and psychology to initiate and run Socratic seminars in her former middle school. Midget not only engaged middle school students in debate and taught them how to support their arguments using Socratic principles, but she also taught them the value of hard work. Now she is studying psychology in college.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Met Schools Have Radically Transformed the Lives of Disadvantaged Adolescents

Originally published in BOLD Favor Magazine

By Lynda Dell

Over the past 20 years, the Met Schools have been flourishing in many major cities across the USA, from Providence, Rhode Island to San Diego, California. Their graduation rates are soaring in areas once deemed high school drop-out zones.

Nationally recognized innovators Dennis Littky and Elliot Washor have turned the traditional education model on its head to create a blueprint for all the Met Schools, which is the Big Picture Learning, (BPL), approach that is rooted in the three R’s—relationships; relevant real-world projects driven by student’s aspirations and interests; and rigor of meeting all of the educational requirements.

In 1995, former Rhode Island Education Commissioner Peter McWalters asked two former renowned principals Littky and Washor to build from the ground up a metropolitan career and technical education center, The Met, in one of the poorest districts in Providence. They were hired because of their track record for turning failing schools around explained Carlos Moreno, Co-Executive of Big Picture Learning Company.

Today, Met Schools are cropping up everywhere with the support from the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation and many others.

“The biggest problem with traditional schools today is that they look exactly as they did when the concept of schools first began,” said Moreno, “where teachers are purveyors of knowledge and students are simply the recipients.”

They are large, impersonal institutions that rely heavily on standardized testing. Moreover, Moreno explains the disconnect between learning in the classroom and applying knowledge in the real-world.

“We start by building relationships with our students, connecting to their families, helping to understand the student’s entire situation,” explained Moreno. Met schools don’t focus on student’s challenges but do provide extra support as needed.

Met students build a personalized learning plan based on their interests and as interns they develop a product or program that addresses a  real-world problem in that industry working closely with their mentor.

Veteran English Teacher Barbara Gardner, who came to Met East High School in Camden, New Jersey three years ago, has seen tremendous growth in her students.

This year her sophomore class presents their Gateway research project. One student is interested in robotics, so he is pursuing his internship at a local engineering firm where he is using computer-aided design to create a line of robots.

“We will be building all of his future skills, and the whole time he will be studying something that he loves,” says Gardner.    “I oversee student’s personal learning plans really wrapping in all the different content areas into a project to make sure that they are rigorous enough.”  

Why has Moreno made BPL his life’s work? He knows the tremendous challenges that students have and the support that they need to cross the finish line.

 “So we look at their schooling as a marathon--not a four-yard dash. These kids could end up joining gangs, in prison, or even dead but they don’t because they are engaged in the learning process and that has transformed their lives,” says Moreno.

Middle School Students Led Socratic Seminars for Parents and Peers

For her senior thesis, Lashonda Midget, former Met East High School student, in Camden, NJ, combined her passion for studying the law and psychology to initiate and run Socratic seminars in her former middle school. Midget not only engaged middle school students in debate and taught them how to support their arguments using Socratic principles, but she also taught them the value of hard work. Now she is studying psychology in college.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Met Schools Have Radically Transformed the Lives of Disadvantaged Adolescents

Originally published in BOLD Favor Magazine

By Lynda Dell

Over the past 20 years, the Met Schools have been flourishing in many major cities across the USA, from Providence, Rhode Island to San Diego, California. Their graduation rates are soaring in areas once deemed high school drop-out zones.

Nationally recognized innovators Dennis Littky and Elliot Washor have turned the traditional education model on its head to create a blueprint for all the Met Schools, which is the Big Picture Learning, (BPL), approach that is rooted in the three R’s—relationships; relevant real-world projects driven by student’s aspirations and interests; and rigor of meeting all of the educational requirements.

In 1995, former Rhode Island Education Commissioner Peter McWalters asked two former renowned principals Littky and Washor to build from the ground up a metropolitan career and technical education center, The Met, in one of the poorest districts in Providence. They were hired because of their track record for turning failing schools around explained Carlos Moreno, Co-Executive of Big Picture Learning Company.

Today, Met Schools are cropping up everywhere with the support from the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation and many others.

“The biggest problem with traditional schools today is that they look exactly as they did when the concept of schools first began,” said Moreno, “where teachers are purveyors of knowledge and students are simply the recipients.”

They are large, impersonal institutions that rely heavily on standardized testing. Moreover, Moreno explains the disconnect between learning in the classroom and applying knowledge in the real-world.

“We start by building relationships with our students, connecting to their families, helping to understand the student’s entire situation,” explained Moreno. Met schools don’t focus on student’s challenges but do provide extra support as needed.

Met students build a personalized learning plan based on their interests and as interns they develop a product or program that addresses a  real-world problem in that industry working closely with their mentor.

Veteran English Teacher Barbara Gardner, who came to Met East High School in Camden, New Jersey three years ago, has seen tremendous growth in her students.

This year her sophomore class presents their Gateway research project. One student is interested in robotics, so he is pursuing his internship at a local engineering firm where he is using computer-aided design to create a line of robots.

“We will be building all of his future skills, and the whole time he will be studying something that he loves,” says Gardner.    “I oversee student’s personal learning plans really wrapping in all the different content areas into a project to make sure that they are rigorous enough.”  

Why has Moreno made BPL his life’s work? He knows the tremendous challenges that students have and the support that they need to cross the finish line.

 “So we look at their schooling as a marathon--not a four-yard dash. These kids could end up joining gangs, in prison, or even dead but they don’t because they are engaged in the learning process and that has transformed their lives,” says Moreno.

Middle School Students Led Socratic Seminars for Parents and Peers

For her senior thesis, Lashonda Midget, former Met East High School student, in Camden, NJ, combined her passion for studying the law and psychology to initiate and run Socratic seminars in her former middle school. Midget not only engaged middle school students in debate and taught them how to support their arguments using Socratic principles, but she also taught them the value of hard work. Now she is studying psychology in college.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Met Schools Have Radically Transformed the Lives of Disadvantaged Adolescents

Originally published in BOLD Favor Magazine

By Lynda Dell

Over the past 20 years, the Met Schools have been flourishing in many major cities across the USA, from Providence, Rhode Island to San Diego, California. Their graduation rates are soaring in areas once deemed high school drop-out zones.

Nationally recognized innovators Dennis Littky and Elliot Washor have turned the traditional education model on its head to create a blueprint for all the Met Schools, which is the Big Picture Learning, (BPL), approach that is rooted in the three R’s—relationships; relevant real-world projects driven by student’s aspirations and interests; and rigor of meeting all of the educational requirements.

In 1995, former Rhode Island Education Commissioner Peter McWalters asked two former renowned principals Littky and Washor to build from the ground up a metropolitan career and technical education center, The Met, in one of the poorest districts in Providence. They were hired because of their track record for turning failing schools around explained Carlos Moreno, Co-Executive of Big Picture Learning Company.

Today, Met Schools are cropping up everywhere with the support from the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation and many others.

“The biggest problem with traditional schools today is that they look exactly as they did when the concept of schools first began,” said Moreno, “where teachers are purveyors of knowledge and students are simply the recipients.”

They are large, impersonal institutions that rely heavily on standardized testing. Moreover, Moreno explains the disconnect between learning in the classroom and applying knowledge in the real-world.

“We start by building relationships with our students, connecting to their families, helping to understand the student’s entire situation,” explained Moreno. Met schools don’t focus on student’s challenges but do provide extra support as needed.

Met students build a personalized learning plan based on their interests and as interns they develop a product or program that addresses a  real-world problem in that industry working closely with their mentor.

Veteran English Teacher Barbara Gardner, who came to Met East High School in Camden, New Jersey three years ago, has seen tremendous growth in her students.

This year her sophomore class presents their Gateway research project. One student is interested in robotics, so he is pursuing his internship at a local engineering firm where he is using computer-aided design to create a line of robots.

“We will be building all of his future skills, and the whole time he will be studying something that he loves,” says Gardner.    “I oversee student’s personal learning plans really wrapping in all the different content areas into a project to make sure that they are rigorous enough.”  

Why has Moreno made BPL his life’s work? He knows the tremendous challenges that students have and the support that they need to cross the finish line.

 “So we look at their schooling as a marathon--not a four-yard dash. These kids could end up joining gangs, in prison, or even dead but they don’t because they are engaged in the learning process and that has transformed their lives,” says Moreno.

Middle School Students Led Socratic Seminars for Parents and Peers

For her senior thesis, Lashonda Midget, former Met East High School student, in Camden, NJ, combined her passion for studying the law and psychology to initiate and run Socratic seminars in her former middle school. Midget not only engaged middle school students in debate and taught them how to support their arguments using Socratic principles, but she also taught them the value of hard work. Now she is studying psychology in college.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Met Schools Have Radically Transformed the Lives of Disadvantaged Adolescents

Originally published in BOLD Favor Magazine

By Lynda Dell

Over the past 20 years, the Met Schools have been flourishing in many major cities across the USA, from Providence, Rhode Island to San Diego, California. Their graduation rates are soaring in areas once deemed high school drop-out zones.

Nationally recognized innovators Dennis Littky and Elliot Washor have turned the traditional education model on its head to create a blueprint for all the Met Schools, which is the Big Picture Learning, (BPL), approach that is rooted in the three R’s—relationships; relevant real-world projects driven by student’s aspirations and interests; and rigor of meeting all of the educational requirements.

In 1995, former Rhode Island Education Commissioner Peter McWalters asked two former renowned principals Littky and Washor to build from the ground up a metropolitan career and technical education center, The Met, in one of the poorest districts in Providence. They were hired because of their track record for turning failing schools around explained Carlos Moreno, Co-Executive of Big Picture Learning Company.

Today, Met Schools are cropping up everywhere with the support from the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation and many others.

“The biggest problem with traditional schools today is that they look exactly as they did when the concept of schools first began,” said Moreno, “where teachers are purveyors of knowledge and students are simply the recipients.”

They are large, impersonal institutions that rely heavily on standardized testing. Moreover, Moreno explains the disconnect between learning in the classroom and applying knowledge in the real-world.

“We start by building relationships with our students, connecting to their families, helping to understand the student’s entire situation,” explained Moreno. Met schools don’t focus on student’s challenges but do provide extra support as needed.

Met students build a personalized learning plan based on their interests and as interns they develop a product or program that addresses a  real-world problem in that industry working closely with their mentor.

Veteran English Teacher Barbara Gardner, who came to Met East High School in Camden, New Jersey three years ago, has seen tremendous growth in her students.

This year her sophomore class presents their Gateway research project. One student is interested in robotics, so he is pursuing his internship at a local engineering firm where he is using computer-aided design to create a line of robots.

“We will be building all of his future skills, and the whole time he will be studying something that he loves,” says Gardner.    “I oversee student’s personal learning plans really wrapping in all the different content areas into a project to make sure that they are rigorous enough.”  

Why has Moreno made BPL his life’s work? He knows the tremendous challenges that students have and the support that they need to cross the finish line.

 “So we look at their schooling as a marathon--not a four-yard dash. These kids could end up joining gangs, in prison, or even dead but they don’t because they are engaged in the learning process and that has transformed their lives,” says Moreno.

Middle School Students Led Socratic Seminars for Parents and Peers

For her senior thesis, Lashonda Midget, former Met East High School student, in Camden, NJ, combined her passion for studying the law and psychology to initiate and run Socratic seminars in her former middle school. Midget not only engaged middle school students in debate and taught them how to support their arguments using Socratic principles, but she also taught them the value of hard work. Now she is studying psychology in college.

 

 

The Met Schools Have Radically Transformed the Lives of Disadvantaged Adolescents

Originally published in BOLD Favor Magazine

By Lynda Dell

Over the past 20 years, the Met Schools have been flourishing in many major cities across the USA, from Providence, Rhode Island to San Diego, California. Their graduation rates are soaring in areas once deemed high school drop-out zones.

Nationally recognized innovators Dennis Littky and Elliot Washor have turned the traditional education model on its head to create a blueprint for all the Met Schools, which is the Big Picture Learning, (BPL), approach that is rooted in the three R’s—relationships; relevant real-world projects driven by student’s aspirations and interests; and rigor of meeting all of the educational requirements.

In 1995, former Rhode Island Education Commissioner Peter McWalters asked two former renowned principals Littky and Washor to build from the ground up a metropolitan career and technical education center, The Met, in one of the poorest districts in Providence. They were hired because of their track record for turning failing schools around explained Carlos Moreno, Co-Executive of Big Picture Learning Company.

Today, Met Schools are cropping up everywhere with the support from the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation and many others.

“The biggest problem with traditional schools today is that they look exactly as they did when the concept of schools first began,” said Moreno, “where teachers are purveyors of knowledge and students are simply the recipients.”

They are large, impersonal institutions that rely heavily on standardized testing. Moreover, Moreno explains the disconnect between learning in the classroom and applying knowledge in the real-world.

“We start by building relationships with our students, connecting to their families, helping to understand the student’s entire situation,” explained Moreno. Met schools don’t focus on student’s challenges but do provide extra support as needed.

Met students build a personalized learning plan based on their interests and as interns they develop a product or program that addresses a  real-world problem in that industry working closely with their mentor.

Veteran English Teacher Barbara Gardner, who came to Met East High School in Camden, New Jersey three years ago, has seen tremendous growth in her students.

This year her sophomore class presents their Gateway research project. One student is interested in robotics, so he is pursuing his internship at a local engineering firm where he is using computer-aided design to create a line of robots.

“We will be building all of his future skills, and the whole time he will be studying something that he loves,” says Gardner.    “I oversee student’s personal learning plans really wrapping in all the different content areas into a project to make sure that they are rigorous enough.”  

Why has Moreno made BPL his life’s work? He knows the tremendous challenges that students have and the support that they need to cross the finish line.

 “So we look at their schooling as a marathon--not a four-yard dash. These kids could end up joining gangs, in prison, or even dead but they don’t because they are engaged in the learning process and that has transformed their lives,” says Moreno.

Middle School Students Led Socratic Seminars for Parents and Peers

For her senior thesis, Lashonda Midget, former Met East High School student, in Camden, NJ, combined her passion for studying the law and psychology to initiate and run Socratic seminars in her former middle school. Midget not only engaged middle school students in debate and taught them how to support their arguments using Socratic principles, but she also taught them the value of hard work. Now she is studying psychology in college.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Met Schools Have Radically Transformed the Lives of Disadvantaged Adolescents

Originally published in BOLD Favor Magazine

By Lynda Dell

Over the past 20 years, the Met Schools have been flourishing in many major cities across the USA, from Providence, Rhode Island to San Diego, California. Their graduation rates are soaring in areas once deemed high school drop-out zones.

Nationally recognized innovators Dennis Littky and Elliot Washor have turned the traditional education model on its head to create a blueprint for all the Met Schools, which is the Big Picture Learning, (BPL), approach that is rooted in the three R’s—relationships; relevant real-world projects driven by student’s aspirations and interests; and rigor of meeting all of the educational requirements.

In 1995, former Rhode Island Education Commissioner Peter McWalters asked two former renowned principals Littky and Washor to build from the ground up a metropolitan career and technical education center, The Met, in one of the poorest districts in Providence. They were hired because of their track record for turning failing schools around explained Carlos Moreno, Co-Executive of Big Picture Learning Company.

Today, Met Schools are cropping up everywhere with the support from the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation and many others.

“The biggest problem with traditional schools today is that they look exactly as they did when the concept of schools first began,” said Moreno, “where teachers are purveyors of knowledge and students are simply the recipients.”

They are large, impersonal institutions that rely heavily on standardized testing. Moreover, Moreno explains the disconnect between learning in the classroom and applying knowledge in the real-world.

“We start by building relationships with our students, connecting to their families, helping to understand the student’s entire situation,” explained Moreno. Met schools don’t focus on student’s challenges but do provide extra support as needed.

Met students build a personalized learning plan based on their interests and as interns they develop a product or program that addresses a  real-world problem in that industry working closely with their mentor.

Veteran English Teacher Barbara Gardner, who came to Met East High School in Camden, New Jersey three years ago, has seen tremendous growth in her students.

This year her sophomore class presents their Gateway research project. One student is interested in robotics, so he is pursuing his internship at a local engineering firm where he is using computer-aided design to create a line of robots.

“We will be building all of his future skills, and the whole time he will be studying something that he loves,” says Gardner.    “I oversee student’s personal learning plans really wrapping in all the different content areas into a project to make sure that they are rigorous enough.”  

Why has Moreno made BPL his life’s work? He knows the tremendous challenges that students have and the support that they need to cross the finish line.

 “So we look at their schooling as a marathon--not a four-yard dash. These kids could end up joining gangs, in prison, or even dead but they don’t because they are engaged in the learning process and that has transformed their lives,” says Moreno.

Middle School Students Led Socratic Seminars for Parents and Peers

For her senior thesis, Lashonda Midget, former Met East High School student, in Camden, NJ, combined her passion for studying the law and psychology to initiate and run Socratic seminars in her former middle school. Midget not only engaged middle school students in debate and taught them how to support their arguments using Socratic principles, but she also taught them the value of hard work. Now she is studying psychology in college.