The UN has voted to end Wonder Woman’s Tenure as an honorary ambassador this coming Friday, bringing about mixed reactions. While Wonder Woman’s appointment as a woman’s rights figure is surprising- why appoint a fictional character when we have so many real life women fighting for women’s rights all over the world, it was the reasoning for removing Diana Prince from the position is equally ridiculous.

                Opponents to Wonder Woman’s appointment took to criticizing her for being a “large breasted, white woman of impossible proportions, scantily clad in a shimmery, thigh-baring body suit” according to the petition that was signed to remove Wonder Woman as an honorary ambassador- a role adopted for other characters like Winnie the Pooh and Tinkerbell. Among other concerns were the facts that Wonder Woman is American and “too violent”. So, we have a mascot for women’s rights and she is immediately criticized based on her appearance, and how she chooses to dress? Say it slowly, someone who is supposed to be the symbol for women’s equality in the United Nations, needs to have a different figure, and dress more conservatively. That form of though is the very reason that we still need a figure to represent women’s issues.

                In all technicality, Wonder Woman is an Amazon, which makes her more Greek than American, though the Amazons are often referred to as “a race of women” meaning that Diana Prince is not white, but part of a mythical race of people, or part Scythian, depending on what source you follow. Now, the Amazons, in Greek mythology, hold sacred the goddess Artemis- a Greek deity who is associated with the moon, nature, and hunting. Artemis is often depicted scantily clad in Greek art, so it would be no surprise that Amazons, being a warrior society in a warm climate would choose clothing that is minimalistic. Amazons may or may not be an actual race, and their culture is not a well-documented culture. But that is what you get when dealing with a fictional character. So the UN is saying that they cannot accept the culture and mythology of a fictional character who is of a mythical race because she looks white, and is scantily clad? That is beyond idiotic.

                Even more staggering than the reasons for Wonder Woman’s removal from the position of ambassador, is the need to appoint a fictional character in the first place. There are many women throughout the world who are actively fighting for women’s rights. One prominent example is Malala Yousafzai who, in 2014, won the Nobel Peace Prize. And why limit the position to one woman? Women face a variety of issues throughout the world from lack of education, to forced marriage and abuse. Maybe, just maybe, this is a job for more than one woman. Oh hell, if we are still criticizing fictional super-heroines based on their outfits and figure, we definitely need more than one! 

Published by Irina Yakubin