There are going to be times when life doesn't go the way we expect or desire it to - it's inevitable and unfortunately, it's a part of life's cruel and wicked ways. 

I was reminded of this fact when I received my results and found that they were not what I had hoped they would be, in turn causing me to consider alternative options and question where I was to go in the next stages of my academic career.

At first I was upset and unsure, because nobody wants to have to veer from something they love or admit that something hasn't exactly turned out the way it should have, and I certainly didn't. I asked myself so many questions as to why I was now in this sticky predicament in which I had no idea how to get out of. It just confused me even more - I hadn't been expecting this at all.

Even though this hadn't gone the way it was supposed to, I still had to find a way to turn things around and make the best decisions possible for myself. 

We often avoid having to make alterations to our life plans in the fear that those changes may put us in a worse position than we already are. We're sometimes negative and can only see the obstacles in front of us, rather than the bigger picture of what we can do to overcome it and what life may be like when we do. We want to succeed but often when we have to decide another way to achieve that success, we view it as the end of the world, the end of a chapter which in truth, is only just beginning.

This is why, when things go wrong, we have to look at the positive side of the situation and trust that that the next decision we make will be the right one, even if turns out not to be in the future. We have to problem solve rather than problem find and we have to adapt to less than ideal circumstances in order to overcome our fears and disappointment. Even if we may not want to, we also have to consider our options and not limit ourselves to the mindset that a different route is not as good as the one we originally chose.

In the end, one of my subjects had to be changed to something else which, having really enjoyed that subject, made me feel like a failure and made me question my ability to continue with my studies. After thinking through in depth the pros and cons of changing one of my subjects, it is now I realise that this change in path may actually be better for me and that by accepting this, I am not a failure, but I am on a better path to success. 

Have you experienced something similar? What did you do to overcome it?

Published by Stacey Wilkinson