I’ve been looking back at my school life the past year. My juniors are close to finishing a visual communications module, where they go out and shoot for a few classes. Gosh, the shots get better and better.

But I’m writing this article for another reason. As you can see from the title, it’s about why I made this life-changing decision to shoot.

Why do I bother waking up and telling myself that today's the day I get up, dress up, grab my gear and make the effort to get out of the house and travel to the city, all in the name of photography? 

Here's my story.

I never had a passion for photography until that same visual communications module last year. It was the first proper time I held a DSLR and went around the school to shoot. We were given Canon EOS 70Ds, with 18-135mm lenses. And so, I walked around school with my partner (as we had to share cameras) and started shooting.

My very first shot with a DSLR. This was edited using Adobe Photoshop, and I had no idea how to use Lightroom back then. It was featured on my course's Facebook Page.

 

I got a thrill from it. There was somehow, a feeling of satisfaction when I shot a unique or close to perfect angle of  something, and the planets align and lighting and all that is just so perfect. My photos have been featured a couple of times in my school’s Facebook page, and that has given me validation, shown me that I do have potential for photography, to tell stories through lenses, to capture the hidden side of humanity. 

My hobby soon became more of a passion, when my father brought home a brand new Canon EOS 70D with a 18-55mm lens. I tried to shoot with it at every opportunity I got, while my mum worried that I was getting too tanned and my father worried that I would spoil it (seeing as I’m such a klutz).

My body lived and breathed photography. Whenever I had any school holiday or vacation, I would insist that I go out to shoot. I’ve shot at the colonial district, Gardens by the Bay, and even at my grandma’s place in Malaysia. 

I shot this flower at Gardens by the Bay, Singapore. The flowers there are amazing and really well tended. They're so pretty, but after two trips there, I've run out of flowers to shoot. Maybe when they have flower fests, I'll head back there. 

 

Photography has changed my life so much, I can't even measure it. I now look at everything with a different perspective. My eyes have become those of a photographer’s; looking at everything and trying to find the best angle to capture the image. I would observe my surroundings and notice things that I’ve never noticed before. Every building, plant and person, is just waiting to be shot, framed and their story is just waiting to be shared with the world. 

And I’m not going to stop until I tell the story of a billion, of a trillion, of everything and everything around me. Which is pretty impossible because everything has more than one story to be told. I will work to improve my art, hone my skills, and work to become a better photographer, day by day.

I was inspired to write this article because of my friend, Nicholas, who's a street photographer. (I think.) One of his recent Instagram posts had a caption: "I shoot to express my feelings. What about you?"

Well, Nicholas and reader, here is my answer.

I shoot to tell a story.

You can check out Nicholas' Instagram account here. He's good at what he does, you won't be disappointed: http://instagram.com/nixxholas

I have a photography blog where I upload my works. If you're interested, head over there to take a look: http://eunicenice.wix.com/photography

I accept critics too, be it about MTS or photography. Email me! creativecontemplation@hotmail.com