Millennials get a bad rap.  They're addicted to screens, entitled, and clearly the product of participation trophies and helicopter parents. (Which, if that is the case, let us look no further than Gen X and Boomers to place the blame).

I often hear my peers (older Gen Xers and younger Boomers) bemoaning the upcoming generation, worrying about what we're in for, and pretty much throwing the baby out with the bathwater. Even if they're right, I don't think the criticism is helpful, but I suspect they aren't quite on target.  The millennials I know are stellar individuals.  They know better than to drink and smoke, they aren't promiscuous, and they're respectful, kind, and are using their phones in active socialization, while interacting with each other in real life and to make connections with people far away.  (One of my favorite examples is my daughter and niece, who live several states apart, but while away the hours playing Minecraft together while Skypeing).  So I have been puzzled to hear about these rotten young adults taking over the world.

It's not that I'm under the delusion that the whole millennial generation is 100% on track, of course there is a whole spectrum of people, as with every other generation, but by and large, this study shows that teens are steadily improving over the years.

So I looked into the generational disdain, and found some more fun facts.  

It appears that this phenomenon has been going on for some time.  These "Historical Complaints", keep getting recycled just changing to reflect the current trends, and that each generation is suspicious of the upcoming generation for no other reason than the inherent differences. 

My generation spent too much time talking on the phone and watching television, Millennials spend too much time watching Netflix and using Snap-chat.  While the venue for wasting time has changed, not much else has.  Teens waste time, unwind, and use screens.  So do adults.

But I wonder why, we, the generations responsible for raising the Millennials, are so down on them.  Doesn't it make sense to promote the positive at least as much as we gripe about the problems?  If we're concerned, shouldn't we be trying to jump into their world, meet them where they are, and help them make the improvements we long to see?  Or maybe we are just frightened because the pace of change is too fast for our comfort.  If that's the case, then I like the suggestion to immerse ourselves in the culture of our children instead of bemoaning it.  What if we just happen to find out that our youth are actually doing more things right than wrong?  

The evidence matches my experience. (Yay!)  If you give teens a chance, listen to them, and at least try on their culture, you might be pleasantly surprised.   And Millennials, don't pay too much heed to the haters.  You've got this.   Keep doing what you're doing and take over the world.  You're ready, and some of us are cheering you on!