Burgeon: (v) to grow or increase rapidly; flourish.

If you don’t learn the tricks, you’ll get fooled at the circus.

Life is a carnival.

Actually, it’s a “carnival of errors” which are overly promoted, while great ideas which need time to simmer in the pot are thrown out with the daily wash.

How can you tell if something is going to burgeon and bring forth great possibilities?

You certainly can’t assess the value because it spawns immediate popularity. We humans are picky–if we’re not familiar with it, if it doesn’t look the same, or if someone really cool fails to recommend it, we are suspicious, or dare I say, even bratty.

You would think that some ideas that burgeoned in the past, proving themselves to be valuable, would be revered. But it seems that each generation has to re-discover for themselves “do unto others as you would have them do unto you,” and the fact that if you don’t sow, you shouldn’t expect to reap.

Matter of fact, the most noble pursuit one can have during this brief journey on Earth, is finding things that will be around in a hundred years.

And instead of allowing them to be shoved to the rear of the bus, we stand up, like Rosa Parks, and push them to the front.

Published by Jonathan Cring