Corporation: (n) any group of persons united or regarded as united in one body.

There are two words that are similarly spelled, and also essential to one another if either is to become a reality:

Corporation; cooperation.

The problem comes when the pursuit of cooperation becomes bogged down with so many erroneous ideas and abstract opinions that it becomes impossible to land on a single plan that can be joyfully pursued by all.

Likewise, when a corporation begins to believe it doesn’t need the cooperation of all of its parts and labor, but instead, fosters the concept of “a chosen few,” 
then the disgruntled workers will gradually grind the progress to a halt.

The goal is to get a corporation to cooperation, and once cooperation is present, unite within the corporation to achieve the goals.

Yet, as long as we identify ourselves in America by a color code of red, blue and purple; white, black, red and yellow; and pink and blue, we will never be able to have the cooperation to become the corporation that James Madison and the writers of the Constitution envisioned.

So what is the first step in gaining cooperation, lending itself to corporation?

Find the single highest goal and build up the ideas upon that premise—because they are in line and in purpose.

For the United States of America, the highest goal is freedom and justice.

For spirituality, the premise is “love your neighbor as yourself.”

And for business, it’s “making a better product for the customer.”

If we, as a country, would begin to form cooperation on this type of thinking, our corporation would begin to sprout with great promise, and both emotional and financial bounty.

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Published by Jonathan Cring