In retrospect to World Teachers Day which was held on October 28th 2016 a new survey commissioned by the Commonwealth Bank of Australia has revealed one in two Australians are likely to choose their career path based on the subjects taught by their favourite teachers. Western Australians were most likely to be inspired by their teachers, at 55 percent.

With more than two thirds of Australians believing teachers had one of the most significant impacts on their development. Commonwealth Bank has partnered with education not for profit Schools Plus to recognise great educators through the newly established Commonwealth Bank Teaching Awards.

The Commonwealth Bank Teaching Awards will offer 12 Fellowships of $45,000 for teachers and school leaders who are inspiring and transforming the lives of their students and school communities. Each Fellowship includes $10,000 for the recipient's professional development and $5,000 for participation in a 12 month Fellowship program that includes a study tour to Singapore. In addition, each winners school will receive $30,000 to fund a project designed to improve student performance and well being.

The Commonwealth Bank recent survey has found, that Australians are saying 78 percent of teachers are shaping the future of the country and Australians also believe that great teachers are one of the country's most valuable resources. The national survey also highlighted the lasting impact of  great teaching as 87 percent of Australians believe teachers have the power to improve a students future with 26 percent crediting success to a teacher.

Western Australia was the only state in Australia that favoured their maths teachers, while all of the Eastern States picking English teachers as their favourites.

Teachers and School leaders from all sectors of the Australian school system - Government, Catholic, and Independent - can apply or be nominated for the Awards at

www.teachingawards.com.au

Applications for the Commonwealth Bank Teaching Awards are open until Wednesday, November 30, 2016.