Should Children Be Prohibited From Watching Cartoons

Should Children Be Prohibited From Watching Cartoons

Every parent has the option of deciding for themselves the best way to regulate children's media. The most important thing to consider is that strict rules could produce the opposite results. Do cartoons harm your child? Should you limit your home's entertainment? Animations every day for ten minutes. They are purely coming from Soviet animators. There's no Mickey Mouse here, and they're a symbol of a culture that is foreign.


These strict restrictions aren't overly exaggerated distortions of forums for housewives and are not an original set of guidelines for mothers who are preparing their kids for life in an Old Believer village. It is believed that this "animation genocide" is preached in the present by a majority of parents who believe that this is the way they can shield their children from dangerous and unneeded information, myopia, and headaches.


Due to my work and because I am the mother of two kids, I frequently encounter parents with an uncompromising view of modern animation, films for children, and television shows. However, the statement I don't watch TV is not true until the moment that I ask Why? In reply, a full list of what's not permitted to be watched by children is provided, complete with specific details I have no idea about, even though I enjoy as well as "make" TV. However, generally, my friends aren't "dark" people.





They have an education, a career, and a view of the world. They have their own opinions. This is so powerful that their children are raised in complete silence and, once they have attained some degree of freedom, begin to watch all the time, starting all the way from "SpongeBob" to "South Park." Let's get drunk.


I am not an agent and not bribed by any animation companies. I also cannot convince everyone that you should watch cartoons starting from the birth of the child. It's just our personal experience and feelings about our children and the present in which we live.


My 14-year-old daughter realized at. First, there is a divide between a real year and an animated year and a half. At first, I was deep as any mother of the USSR tried to meld her cartoons into Russian folklore and Suteyev's Soviet cartoons. When she was two years old, my child weighed all the points against her love of animation and decided on Disney princesses.


My daughter was fascinated by watching simple girls transform into beautiful and how wicked stepmothers are lost to beauty queens and how princes riding white horses rescue beautiful women. I was awestruck by the way she strives to maintain her posture "like a princess," is a good host at the table, dances, sings songs, and treats our little brothers with affection, like a true princess.

 

My mother's hand was never up to shut off a full-length show "in the most interesting place" as my son's brain remains very important to me. Also, the myth that says "spoil your eyes if you watch more than ten minutes a day" has been disproved by reading research conducted by Ophthalmologists.


They also claim that the vision of a child is largely genetic. If parents are wearing glasses, then the likelihood that a child will be born with the ability to see with eagles is reduced to none, even if he does not see a single animated show throughout his lifetime. Studies also prove that children can sit and watch uncensored anime television for an extended period of time without affecting their vision. It is enough to estimate the distance between your TV screen to your baby's position, taking into account the dimensions of the screen.


Of course, communicating between parents and children is a primary aspect for children, but reading, books, and walks are also integral elements of a child's life. If you're denying your baby the most cherished word of your childhood - "cartoons" think a hundred times over the impression your child has of you right now. Yes, I have my own story. When she reaches 14 years old, my daughter is 100 percent immersed in the headlines on Sivtsev's dining room table. She maintains her straight back, raises her head like a princess, and hopes to become an animator.

Published by mark farmer

Written by mark farmer

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